Australian and New Zealand Reads in April

April 1, 2011

Our little part of the world may not have as long a history of written stories as the Northern Hemisphere, but Australian and New Zealand authors offer a wealth of material that celebrates our cultural heritage and landscapes and can help us understand out shared history. 

For #oznzreads in April, you might want to try reading some indigenous literature from Australia and New Zealand – such as Alexis Wright’s Carpentaria or Witi Ihimaera’s Whale Rider.  You could choose to delve into the histories of these countries, explore politics or revisit stories surrounding our ANZAC heritage.  Or it may be a time to re/discover the amazing writing for children and young people, or our natural history. 

Even Australian and New Zealand Cooking Books might provide cultural insight and inspiration (and perhaps help solve the mystery of who first invented the pavlova!)

If you would like to share your reading experiences as you explore Australian and New Zealand writing, you can tweet while you read by adding the hashtag #oznzreads to your twitter posts about reading.  You can also use this tag on other websites like flickr, or on your blog – to share with us what you are reading.

There will be a twitter discussion 8.00pm (AEST) 26 April to discuss #oznzreads.  See you online at the end of the month!

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One Response to “Australian and New Zealand Reads in April”

  1. Julie Says:

    Hi there,
    I was looking for reviews of Witi Ihimaera’s ‘The Whale Rider’ when I came across this post for your reading group. Just wondering whether any of your readers might be interested in asking Witi Ihimaera a question about this book? BBC World Book Club on the World Service is interviewing him soon and would love to hear from you. If interested, please email me at World.Bookclub@bbc.co.uk as soon as you can with a question about the book (anything – doesn’t have to be particularly clever!), along with where you’re from/live. We can either arrange for you to talk to Witi Ihimaera himself, or have our presenter put your question to him for you. Then you will be able hear your question on BBC World Service Radio when it airs.
    Best wishes,
    Julie
    BBC World Book Club


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